Award Winners

2019

Online

Gold

“The maddening saga of how an Alzheimer’s ‘cabal’ thwarted progress toward a cure for decades” June 25, 2019

“How an outsider in Alzheimer’s research bucked the prevailing theory — and clawed for validation” Oct. 29, 2019

“As Alzheimer’s drug developers give up on today’s patients, where is the outrage?” Aug. 15, 2018

STAT

Sharon Begley described how the dogmatic belief that beta-amyloid deposits cause Alzheimer’s disease has stymied research into other possible explanations of the disease, including inflammation and infection. Several scientists said those who controlled the Alzheimer’s research agenda were a “cabal” that influenced what studies were published in top journals, which scientists got funded, who got tenure and who received invitations to speak at scientific conferences. George Perry, a neuroscientist at the University of Texas–San Antonio, told Begley that scientists who didn't go along with...Read more

2018

Online

Gold

“The Complicated Legacy of a Panda Who Was Really Good at Sex” Nov. 28, 2017

FiveThirtyEight

The judges praised Maggie Koerth-Baker for an exhaustively reported, elegantly written story about bringing a species back from extinction. It went well beyond the popular image of pandas as cute, iconic creatures who are photogenic representatives of zoo-based conservation efforts. As Koerth-Baker wrote, “Behind the big eyes and rounded frames that signal vulnerability and cuddliness to the human brain, pandas are real, live 200-pound bears. Bears that can shred your flesh. Bears that roll around in the dirt and turn themselves dingy gray. Bears that grow old and frail.” She told the tale...Read more

2017

Online

Gold

“Boomtown, Flood Town”

ProPublica and The Texas Tribune

In a comprehensive, richly interactive story, ProPublica and The Texas Tribune reported that more frequent and fiercer rainstorms are likely in cities like Houston due to climate change, even as unmanaged growth and lack of zoning have made the city more vulnerable to risk of flooding. In a story that presaged the devastating impact of Hurricane Harvey on the Houston area, the reporters took a closer look at two previous storms ─ the Memorial Day Flood of 2015 and the Tax Day Flood of 2016 ─ and described how the loss of undeveloped prairie and wetlands has made areas more prone...Read more

2016

Online

Gold

“Law Ignored, Patients at Risk: Failure to Report - A STAT Investigation” - 13 Dec. 2015

“Failure to report: About the investigation” - 13 Dec. 2015

“STAT investigation sparked improved reporting of study results, NIH says” - 16 Feb. 2016

STAT

 

Charles Piller reported that researchers at leading medical institutions had routinely disregarded a law requiring public reporting of study results to the federal government’s ClinicalTrials.gov database, thereby depriving patients and doctors of information that would help them better compare the effectiveness and side effects of treatments for diseases such as advanced breast cancer. Piller found that four of the top 10 recipients of federal medical research funding from the National Institutes of Health were the worst offenders: Stanford University, the University of...Read more

2015

Online

Gold

"How a Lone Hacker Shredded the Myth of Crowdsourcing" - 9 Feb. 2015

Backchannel

 

Crowdsourcing, which exploits the collective intelligence of thousands of people to tackle big problems, has become popular in business, political, and academic circles. But Mark Harris described how a hacker and a friend infiltrated a DARPA-sponsored "Shredder Challenge" and created havoc. Participants in the challenge had to piece together 6,000 chads from documents that had been put through high-end shredding machines. Some of the teams used sophisticated computer algorithms to help match images of the chads that had been posted online. But the hackers managed...Read more