Award Winners

2010

Children's Science News

"Learning from Bears" - 1 Feb 2010

"Real-Life Bloodsuckers" - 26 Oct. 2009

"Saving the Ozone Layer" - 7 Sept. 2009

Science World (Scholastic)

 

In an entry of three unrelated stories, Cody Crane tackled an admirable breadth of subject matter in stories that took her young readers into the field to show how scientists think and work. She followed a Minnesota research biologist who checked in with hibernating bears for clues on how they manage their winter-long slumber. She also told her readers about vampire bats and other animal bloodsuckers that play an important role in nature. Catherine Hughes, science editor for National Geographic Kids, said that Crane’s writing is “clear, straightforward, kid-...Read more

2009

Children's Science News

"Where Rivers Run Uphill" - 23 July 2008

Science News for Kids

 

Douglas Fox used his journey across Antarctic ice sheets to show how scientists are studying a strange world of lakes and rivers beneath the ice. He wrote that scientists think that “lakes under the ice might act like giant slippery banana peels.” He and the researchers traveled to a lake that is “buried under ice, two Empire State Buildings below our feet.”

Arndt Reuning, a science reporter for Deutschlandradio, said Fox covered “an important issue in a vivid and funny way. He’s a superb and entertaining story-teller.” Catherine Hughes of National Geographic...Read more

2008

Children's Science News

"Roadkill, Horror on Roads" - 15 June 2008

Children's Science Donga

 

The judges liked the offbeat subject matter and the nice description of scientific investigation in Yoon Shin-Young’s piece on the impact of highway roadkills on native species in South Korea. “Yoon Shin-Young’s story was excellent,” said Lila Guterman, a freelance writer formerly with The Chronicle of Higher Education. She said the piece was “interesting to read with lots of great examples, photos and graphics.” Jean-Louis Santini, a science reporter for Agence France-Presse called it “an original piece that clearly presents the issues… a very attractive piece.”...Read more

2007

Children's Science News

"A Whale of a Mystery" - 15 Jan. 2007

Scholastic Science World

 

Chiang told her young readers about an investigation by scientists into the puzzling death of a North Atlantic right whale that was spotted drifting off the coast of Nova Scotia. She described various clues that the researchers followed in trying to determine the cause of death. They eventually concluded that a large, blunt object had hit the whale on one side. Catherine Hughes, a senior editor for National Geographic Kids magazine, said the story met all the criteria. “The mystery is an immediate draw for kids, as is the compelling species, the ever-...Read more

Certificate of Merit

"The Show of the Beautiful Slimers" - 7 Feb. 2007

GEOlino Magazine (Germany)

 

The judging panel recommended a special Certificate of Merit for the runner-up in the children’s news cateogry. Sina Löschke, a writer for GEOlino — a German science magazine for children — wrote an engaging piece about sea slugs. “With lively, imaginative writing and colorful pictures, the story deftly introduces readers to these unusual ocean denizens and cogently explains their biological quirks,” said John Carey of Business Week. Löschke’s piece was published on 7 February 2007.

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2006

Children's Science News

"Fade to White" - 6 Jan. 2006

Current Science

 

Geiger won praise from the judges for explaining the basics of natural selection and evolution to children in a story about the changing color of lizards in the New Mexico desert. “Kids who don’t really give a flip about the debate over evolution that surrounds their classrooms relate to lizards,” said Jeff Nesmith of Cox Newspapers. Laura Helmuth of Smithsonian magazine said Geiger used “clear, amusing, colorful language” in describing natural selection, speciation and the geology of sand dunes. “The explanation of the process of science was non-...Read more

2005

Children's Science News

"Mammoth Hunters" - March 2005

Scholastic's SuperScience

 

Elizabeth Carney gave her young readers an inviting description of the field work by scientists who are studying the remains of an ancient mammoth in Siberia. Laura Helmuth of Smithsonian magazine commended Carney’s use of “inviting, non-patronizing language,” including the amusing image that a mammoth weighs more than 230 fourth graders.

Carney, who wrote her story while working as an intern for Scholastic publications after completing a master’s degree in biomedical journalism at New York University, also told her readers that many questions remain unanswered, such...Read more